Instrument Resources

Research Instruments

Newly Arrived — May, 2017!
Aberrant Behavior Checklist Manual-2.

The original ABC Manual was published in 1985 and the Supplement in 1994. Michael Aman and Nirbhay Singh, the developers of the ABC, have conducted a major overhaul of the Manual in the new Aberrant Behavior Checklist Manual-2. With 400+ scientific studies on the ABC, there is much to report!! For more information click here or the book cover.

 

 

The Annotated Bibliography on the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) helps researchers, clinicians, advanced students, and others to follow publications that have been done with the ABC. Thus far, the ABC has been used in more than 400 studies. The Annotated Bibliography indexes and/or summarizes most of them in four sections, as follows:

  1. Index A —contains a listing of authors who conducted a given study, the date, the page on which a summary can be found, and a brief characterization of the study.  (pages i to xxvi)
  2. Index B — contains a summary of the 35 translations of the ABC into languages other than English that we are aware of. (pages xxvi to xxvii)
  3. The main section (c) describes the ABC’s history, contains more information on foreign translations, explains how to contact the publisher (Slosson Educational Publications), and contains summaries of studies that have used the ABC, with an emphasis on the ABC findings. (pages 1 to 233)
  4. The last section (d) contains a list of some of the studies that are listed in Clinicaltrials.gov that were or are using the ABC for intervention research. These are currently listed in pages 234-243.

Please note: We are not able to keep up with all publications involving the ABC. When we are aware of a publication but have not yet summarized it, we list the citation in section (c). These summaries always lag behind the actual scientific literature and the activity on Clinicaltrials.gov. We apologize for the lags and will happily add studies if colleagues bring them to our attention.

Readers are welcome to make copies of the linked Annotated Bibliography, as needed.
Please direct questions about the Annotated Bibliography or the ABC to Michael Aman, aman.1@osu.edu, phone: (U.S.) 614-895-0826 (9:30 through 18:00 Eastern), FAX: (U.S.) 614-685-3208.

 


The Adult Scale of Hostility and Aggression: Reactive/Proactive (A-SHARP) is an instrument for measuring aggressive and hostile behavior in adults with developmental disabilities develop by OSU faculty Scott Matlock, Ph.D. and Michael Aman, Ph.D and first published in 2011.  This scale was derived through factor analysis of a sample of 512 individuals with developmental disabilities.

To view the user agreement, instructions, and downloadable PDFs of the A-SHARP, the A-SHARP scoring guide, and preliminary norms, please click here.


The Children’s Scale of Hostility and Aggression: Reactive/Proactive (C-SHARP) is an instrument for measuring aggressive and hostile behavior in children with developmental disabilities developed by Cristin Farmer, Ph.D. and Mike Aman, Ph.D and first published in 2009. .  This scale was derived through factor analysis of a sample of 365 children with developmental disabilities.

To view the user agreement, instructions, and downloadable PDFs of the C-SHARP, the C-SHARP scoring algorithm, and preliminary norms, please click here.


The Developmental Disabilities Children’s Global Assessment Scale (DD­CGAS)
The DD­CGAS is a general tool for assessing the overall composite of adaptive and maladaptive behavior of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder  (ASD). It can be used to assess the effects of pharmacological and psychosocial treatments.


The Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form (NCBRF)

The NCBRF is a standardized instrument for assessing child and adolescent behavior. It was first developed by Michael Aman, Ph.D. and published in 1996).  Two variations of the NCBRF are available: one for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and one for typically developing children.  The first variation is simply called the NCBRF (developed in 1996), which was derived for children with I/DD, namely those with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and other developmental disabilities (e.g., cerebral palsy). There are two versions of the NCBRF, one for completion by parents and one for teacher ratings. These are similar to one another, but the scoring systems differ slightly.

The Typical IQ version of the NCBRF is designated by the suffix “TIQ” (NCBRF-TIQ). Unfortunately, there is only one version of the TIQ, namely a report for parent completion. The NCBRF-TIQ is briefer than the NCBRF, as several items related to stereotypic and self-injurious behavior did not emerge in analyses of the NCBRF-TIQ.

To view the user agreement, instructions, and downloadable PDF versions of the NCBRF and NCBRF-NIQ, click here.


The OSU Autism Rating Scale-DSM-IV (OARS-4) & OSU Autism CGI
The OSU Autism Rating Scale-DSM-IV (OARS-4) and OSU Autism CGI were developed to provide four types of summary scores: (a) A weighted score based on severity of autism or autism spectrum symptoms derived from clinical interview; (b) A symptom count, based on the same interview; (c) A global severity scale for autism, which takes autism spectrum and related symptoms (e.g., compulsions, problems transitioning, SIB) into account; and (d) A global improvement scale for autism. The four indices appear in the Word file available for download. Investigators and clinicians may make free copies.


The Repetitive Behavior Scale
Readers with interest in the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised may wish to reach out to one of its developers, Dr. Jim Bodfish: jim.bodfish@vanderbilt.edu.

Alternative Score Form for the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised
The Repetitive Behavior Rating Scale – Revised: Independent validation and the effects of subject variables.” Poster presented at Thirty-eighth Annual Meeting of the Gatlinburg Conference on Research and Theory in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Annapolis, MD, March 17-19, 2005.